Zorn's American Subjects...
1881-1891, 1893, 1894 -1895, 1896-1897, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1903-1904, 1905-1910, 1911-1917
1899

Grover Cleveland, 1899, oil on canvas, 121.9 x 91.4 cm., National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., accession no. NPG 77.229. Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) was the 22nd (1885-1889) and 24th (1893-1897) president of the United States. The portrait was painted in Princeton, New Jersey, where Zorn stayed at the Clevelands’ home during some of the work.


Grover Cleveland I, 1899, etching, 22.6 x 17.8 cm., A. 143. The etching is a mirror image of the oil portrait.

Grover Cleveland II, 1899, etching, 22.7 x 17.6 cm., A. 144.

Grover Cleveland, 1899, pencil on paper study for the portrait. It sold at Christie’s, New York, Oct. 29, 1986.

Mrs. Grover Cleveland, 1899, oil on canvas, 137.2 x 92.2 cm., National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., as of 1986. Frances Folsom Cleveland (1864-1947) was the first woman to be married in the White House. Grover Cleveland had been a law partner of Oscar Folsom, Mrs. Cleveland’s father. John H. Dryfhout wrote in 1969, “Tall and graceful and with beautiful dark eyes, she became the most charming woman in the White House since Dolly Madison.” The portrait was painted in Princeton, New Jersey.

Mrs. Grover Cleveland, oil on canvas, unknown date. This copy of Zorn’s portrait was painted by C. Gregory Stapko and is in the collection of the White House, Washington, D.C., accession no. 952.3410.1.

Mrs. Grover Cleveland, 1899, oil on canvas, 68 x 51 cm., Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. It is inscribed by the artist, “Zorn to Mrs. J. L. Gardner 14 Apr. 1899."

Mrs. Grover Cleveland I, 1899, etching, 24.8 x 17.7 cm., A. 145. The etching is a mirror image of the oil portrait.

Mrs. Grover Cleveland II, 1899, etching, 24.7 x 18 cm., A. 146.

Mrs. Grover Cleveland, 1899, pencil on paper, 30.8 x 24.1 cm., Zorn Museum Collection.

According to Gerda Boëthius, Zorn painted a Mr. Procton, a nephew of the Gardner’s, in 1899. Perhaps it was George Proctor, not Procton, who was painted by Zorn that year. Zorn made portraits of two of Mrs. Gardner’s nephews in 1899, but Proctor had no familial relationship to her. A pianist and protégé of Isabella Stewart Gardner’s, the piano virtuoso Paderewski (1860-1941) praised Proctor’s talent after hearing him in Boston. Mrs. Gardner contributed $7,000 for the young man to study in Vienna under Paderewski’s teacher Théodore Leschetizky (1830-1915). Proctor had visited the Gardners in Venice just prior to the Zorns visit in 1894. He wrote to her, “My Venice trip was not to be compared with any pleasure I have ever had or ever expect to have in my life. It is more than I ever supposed mortal men enjoyed.” See The Art of Scandal: The Life and Times of Isabella Stewart Gardner, by Douglass Shand-Tucci (1997).

Dr. George Howard Monks, 1899, oil on canvas, 68.5 x 50.5 cm., private collection. Dr. Monks(1853-1933) was married to George Peabody Gardner’s sister Olga Eliza (b. 1869). He was a Boston surgeon who taught at the Harvard Medical School.

John Chipman Gray, 1899, 70 x 51 cm., oil on canvas, private collection. John Chipman Gray (1839-1915), a cousin to John Gardner, was a lawyer and educator. He was a trustee of John Gardner’s estate.

George Peabody Gardner, 1899, oil on canvas, 182.9 x 106.7 cm, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, accession no. 59.66. George Peabody Gardner (1855-1939) was the son of George Augustus Gardner (1829-1916) and Eliza Endicott Peabody (1834-1876). He was a nephew to John Gardner. The Harvard trained businessman married Esther Burnett. His business acumen allowed John and Isabella Gardner to take extended trips abroad starting in 1894. In John Gardner’s absence, George watched over the family interests. John Gardner chose George to be a trustee of his estate. He assisted Isabella Gardner in her business dealings after John Gardner’s death in 1898.

William Amory Gardner, 1899, oil on canvas, 68 x 50.7 cm., American School of Classical Studies, Athens, Greece. Amory Gardner (1863-1937) was the son of Joseph G. Gardner and a nephew of John Gardner. John and Isabella Gardner helped raise Amory and his brothers after they were orphaned in 1875. He was a Harvard graduate who taught Greek at Groton. He was a founding master of Groton and one of the Massachusetts school’s most generous benefactors.

Martha Dana (later Mrs. William R. Mercer), 1899, oil on canvas, 68.5 x 50.9 cm., Boston Museum of Fine Arts, accession no. 28.513. Martha Dana (1872-1960) was a patron of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, to which she gave her portrait by Zorn in 1928, and the Boston Athenaeum, the Arnold Arboretum, and the Boston Symphony. She was married to William R. Mercer, Jr., a sculptor, based in Doylestown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. William’s brother Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930) was a tile marker in the Arts and Crafts tradition.

Richard Saltonstall, 1899, oil on canvas, 150.5 x 91.5 cm., Massachusetts Historical Society. The portrait is on loan to the Crane House, Ipswish, Massachusetts. Richard Saltonstall (b. ca. 1858) was a founding partner of Gaston, Snow, Saltonstall, and Hunt in Boston, formed in 1895, and was a Harvard classmate and friend of Theodore Roosevelt. It was at Saltonstall’s Chestnut Hill home where Roosevelt met his first wife Alice Hathaway Lee (d. 1882), who was Saltonstall’s first cousin and next door neighbor.

Daniel Hudson Burnham, 1899, oil on canvas, 74.5 x 61.5 cm., Commission of Fine Arts, Washington, D.C., since Sept. 11, 1958. Daniel Burnham (1846-1912) was one of America’s most prominent architects. He was head of architecture at the Chicago World’s Fair.

Edward Livingston Davis, 1899, oil on canvas, 121 x 91 cm., private collection. Edward Livingston Davis (1834-1912) was mayor of Worcester, Massachusetts. John Singer Sargent painted Mrs. Edward L. Davis and Her Son in 1890.

Joseph Randolph Coolidge, 1899, oil on canvas, 68.7 x 51 cm., Harvard University Portrait Collection, accession no. H 663. Randolph Coolidge (ca. 1828-1925) married John Gardner’s sister Julia (1841-1921) in 1860.

Henry Clay Pierce, 1899, oil on canvas, 157 x 107 cm., National Museum, Stockholm. Henry Clay Pierce (1849-1927) dealt in oil, finance, and railroads. He was believed to be the nation’s fourth wealthiest man. Zorn took Pierce to court in St. Louis when the businessman refused to pay for this portrait and the following two portraits.

Mrs. Henry Clay Pierce, 1899, oil on canvas, 152.4 x 106.7 cm., private collection. The portrait sold at Christie’s, Oct. 30, 1985.

Mrs. Eben Richards, 1899, oil on canvas, 152.5 x 107.3 cm., private collection. The portrait sold at Sotheby’s, New York, Oct. 1989. Pearl Richards was the daughter of Henry Clay Pierce.

According to Gerda Boëthius, Zorn painted a second portrait of William Deering, Charles Deering’s father, before departing for Europe in 1899.

On the Atlantic, 1899, etching, 17.7 x 12.7 cm. After a hectic trip to the United States, Zorn relaxed on the ocean on his return trip to Europe. He once wrote to Mrs. Gardner during a voyage to Europe that his only wish was that the trip was longer. The etching depicts a young woman sitting in a deck chair bundled up for the weather. According to Asplund, Zorn possessed a preparatory pencil drawing of this subject.

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